We Had Kale Last Night

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Bob Bauer
December 21, 2017 (Last Updated: ) | Reading Time: 2 minutes
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December 21, 2017

We had kale last night, I forgot to put apple cider vinegar on it, and it was delicious. I guess the cold nights that sweeten up the brussels sprouts also make the kale more tasty. Dunno, gonna pick some more today. It tastes a bit bitter to me in the summer, but what wouldn't next to the sweet corn, green beans and zucchini. I'm also going to take everything out of the greenhouse that I won't be using until next spring because I hate clutter. The sprinkler, plastic rolls, diatomaceous earth, dibble, gopher traps, squirrel trap, axe, scissors, trowel and miscellaneous junk will get stored in the barn.

The fish emulsion and Deadline go into the house because they should be kept from freezing. Winter is tidy up time. Remember " Cleanliness is next to Godliness.".

December 22, 2017

The first official day of winter was the first day I didn't wear a coat since October. It was sunny and warm and felt like spring. The brown colors of earth and trees were all shades of red. The water droplets, instead of frost on the grass, highlighted the lime greens and shades of darker colors. With the blue sky overhead I was ready to plant onions. I have no doubt onions are incredibly good for your health and well being, but the winner of today's vegetable of worth is the tomato.

Research has indicated that it benefits your lungs as well as your heart. Good news for smokers and anyone who lives in the cities. Air pollution is unavoidable in urban environments. Also of note is the discovery that green leafy vegetables can help prevent, and negate the effects of Alzheimer's disease. So y'all gotta eat your greens so you don't forget to eat your veggies.

December 23, 2017

The last of the cherry tree leaves have fallen and I still don't have any leaves stored away for spring. All seven stalls are occupied now so I'm getting plenty of raw material for compost. I think it takes ten wheelbarrow loads of leaves to equal one of compost judging by the weight. I should have enough compost by spring to mulch most of the garden again. Putting it on top of the soil instead of working it in ensures the ground gets what it can handle.

Nitrogen is required to further decompose the material, and if buried can deplete the soil and hinder plant growth. I pile each cartload of raw stall cleanings in a holding area and use the tractor to scoop them up once it's full, and pile them into a larger pile. The large piles get watered and flipped several times before they turn dark black. Sometimes I put a tarp over it so people won't see what I've got.

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