I Caught A Third Rat In The Same Spot

I caught a third rat in the same spot as the other two. Same size too, so either he was a visiting uncle, or I’m working on a family of siblings 🙂 I’ve got to rethink my piling garden waste mixed with blackberry vines and grape trimmings along the fence lines because it’s way too enabling for them. It doesn’t compress because the sticks provide air pockets and the rats can hide in them, thwarting the efforts of the cats.
I’ve also caught two birds because they like peanut butter too. Everything running around at night seems to like peanut butter and it’s easy to apply to the trigger. I learned to smear it around liberally, and coat the bottom of the trigger too, so when they finish the top they have to move the trigger to get to the bottom.  
The blackberries are not all decorated for Christmas this year, with bright red, yellow, orange, burgundy and green leaves. They look a bit forlorn as if they are tired. I wonder if the lack of rain is responsible? The spider webs are scant also, but it may be there is less dew because of the dry conditions, and therefore the webs are less obvious.
Gardeners take pride in noticing small changes in their environment, like an unexpected shadow or a down-turned leaf, because we respect the gifts of nature that unfold over time, and enjoy the discovery, in the moment, of the things that are subtle. Excitement is the “coin of the realm” in the world of activity, but constantly seeking it leads to the necessity of even more to get the same high. Like adrenaline junkies we manipulate the future, instead of peacefully accepting the present.
We really should be using the ashes from our wood stoves and fireplaces in the garden this time of year because they add valuable nutrients. They also help eliminate the problems we face of creating acidic soil from all of our leaf mulch and compost. Finding out how much lime costs has me considering scattering ashes around the garden again, even though I will find bits of metal, plastic and unburnt wood for months afterwards. It makes my garden feel like a trash pile.
I’ve thought about sifting the ashes to remove the chunks, but I abhor breathing the dust. Knowing that foreign particles in our lungs are expelled by coughing, and thinking about how little I cough during the day, makes me wish we had a valve at the bottom of our lungs to purge them. I may need to get a dust mask 🙂

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