A Giant Jackrabbit Was In The Garden

A giant jackrabbit was in the garden yesterday morning. It leaped up onto the compost pile and over the fence. Such a large, strong, athletic and mobile adversary left me a bit stunned. I will be unable to prevent his returning whenever he wants. A quick garden tour didn’t find any munched plants so he might have been on Recon :). My internet search said that having dogs or cats deters rabbits, but I have both. I guess it’s a good excuse for not picking up the dog poop :). It reminded me to get bird netting over my peas, even though they aren’t up yet. A rabbit could mow the whole row down in a night. Working with bird netting is my least favorite garden task. It’s always crumpled up and constantly tries to return to its overwintered shape. I’ve found that using clothes pins helps get it stretched out along the trellis on top, and rocks or boards along the bottom keep the birds from getting underneath. It needs tension along the bottom to prevent the birds from picking it up with their beaks and scooting under.

I got an 8′ double row of spinach planted in the greenhouse yesterday. That should provide an ample supply to compliment the asparagus that is a perpetual spring treat. I spaced the seeds 2″ apart and covered with a half inch of compost to give them an easy, fluffy top dressing to push up through. The seed package says spinach doesn’t like acid soil so they are prime candidates for an application of lime. It’s also recommend to thin them to 6′ apart when they are 2′ tall. I should probably thin one row and let the other one grow into a hedge and see which one is more fun. I also got about half of my wire tunnels with bird netting on them cut out from the blackberry vines that were growing through them. I need to find a different place to store them. They fit so perfectly behind the greenhouse that it’s convenient. No matter how much I complain about bird netting, I just flat out wouldn’t have a garden if I didn’t cover my plants. The water faucet is the only thing of more value.

The horseradish is putting up new growth, a sure sign of spring. Once you plant horseradish you never have to plant it again. You always leave some roots when you harvest and they grow a new plant for you. The willow buds are turning white and look like popcorn on a stick. Another sure sign of spring. Winters just seem too long for us gardeners so we keep looking for signs that it’s coming to an end. Something flew by my face the other day and I thought maybe the pollinators were returning. Gnats and spiders are my only insect companions this time of year, but there were five different species of sparrow entertaining me in the garden today. They seem to like hopping around my wire tunnels. Maybe they’re looking for a way in because I’ve trained them where the good stuff is 🙂

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