Try Eating the Leaves of your Broccoli

I picked broccoli leaves yesterday and they were surprisingly clean. There was nothing in the water after the first rince. I don’t know how long it will be before we eat them because the cook turned her nose up at them. Old dogs and all that. She has beets, Brussels sprouts, broccoli, chard, kale, cabbage and carrots in our second fridge that will probably get cooked before the broccoli leaves, and if this winter garden keeps going like it has, I’ll keep picking stuff until the broccoli leaves go bad.

My broccoli bushes are too big to pull up this year. The short handled pitchfork works great. With a little leverage they pop right out. I can get a lot done when I’m working on my knees. I weeded around each plant after I shook the dirt off the roots and realized what a good weeding tool the pitchfork is.

It turns the soil that is black and tilthy so i can count my earthworms. I imagine it wouldn’t work so well in an unamended soil.The hula hoe works best on small weeds where a back and forth motion is not inhibited by the size of their stems. I’ve always used a hand held weeder for larger weeds but now I’ll use the pitchfork.

The cook sauted the Brussels sprouts leaves last night because she went on line to find out how to cook them. Much disappoint. All I tasted was garlic and onions while munching on roughage. When she boiled them the last time, they were mild and tender with the flavor of cooked cabbage. Fooled again by the interweb.

Sauté is a french word that means “jump” because of the way you flip the pan while stirring the contents. It seems labor intensive compared to using the microwave but for lots of people cooking means more than just “heating until done”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *